06 Four Urban Projects | Haus-Rucker-Co

06-d Gelbes Herz.jpg
06-c Ballon fuer Zwei.jpg
06-a Schraege Ebene.jpg
06-b Turm, Neuss.jpg
06-d Gelbes Herz.jpg
06-c Ballon fuer Zwei.jpg
06-a Schraege Ebene.jpg
06-b Turm, Neuss.jpg

06 Four Urban Projects | Haus-Rucker-Co

432.00

Title                 Four Urban Projects
Artist               Haus-Rucker-Co
Year                2012
Medium          Set of four photographic prints
Dimensions    Schräge Ebene (Inclined Plane), (1976)/2012, 30 x 24 cm; Turm, Neuss (Tower, Neuss), (1985)/2012, 24 x 16cm; Ballon für Zwei (Balloon for Two), (1967)/2012, 14.8 x 24.2 cm; Gelbes Herz (Yellow Heart), (1968)/2012, 18 x 24.2 cm
Edition            20
Unframed

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Haus-Rucker-Co’s designs for inflatable structures, prosthetic devices and interventions into public spaces were also blueprints for social change and an experiential theory of architecture. Situating itself in the transitional ground between architecture, design and action art, the group was unique in its distinctive emphasis on the perceptual realm.

Their pneumatic projects aimed to counteract apathy and passive acceptance of one’s environment by distorting the experience of public and private spaces, evoking a “feeling of foreignness”. Immersive environments, bubble and capsule forms, and mind-expanding structures for private contemplation or forging personal connections all delineate not only specific physical zones but also psychological spaces. Haus-Rucker-Co also took a playful approach to architectural materials and strategies. Plastics—mutable, flexible, inexpensive, and with seemingly infinite potential—provided not only the material for many of their projects but also served as a model for the era’s futurist vision of a democratic and mobile lifestyle.

The photographs selected for Four Urban Projects demonstrate a connection to the urban landscape recurrent throughout Haus-Rucker-Co’s quarter-century collaboration. The group’s interactions with, interventions into, disruptions to, and reframings of the city sought to shift public perceptions of everyday urban experience, by locating the ‘human scale’ within the metropolis and initiating new modes of spatial consciousness.